Tatsat Chronicle Magazine

China and Pakistan are two of the ten countries where internet freedom is deteriorating

An international freedom advocacy and research organisation has identified Pakistan as one of the top ten countries in the world where internet freedom is eroding, raising concerns about the country’s proposed policies, which could further erode cyber liberty

According to Freedom House, an international freedom advocacy organisation, China and Pakistan are among the top ten countries in the world where internet freedom is deteriorating. According to the group’s research, “Freedom on the Net 2021: The Worldwide Drive to Control Big Tech,” global internet freedom has fallen for the 11th year in a row.

The audit also voiced worries about Pakistan’s new policies, which might limit internet freedom. According to the report, internet freedom has deteriorated the most in Myanmar, Belarus, and Uganda. Myanmar also reported a 14-point drop, the largest since the organisation began documenting the country.

Iceland, Canada, and Germany were among the top ten countries having the most freedom on the internet. For the seventh year in a row, China has been named the world’s worst abuser of internet freedom, scoring zero points in the category of “violation of user rights.” The ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is extending its grip on the state bureaucracy, the media, internet expression, religious groups, colleges, enterprises, and civil society organisations, according to the report, and it is undermining its own already limited rule-of-law advances.

Iceland, Estonia, Canada, Costa Rica, Taiwan, Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Georgia, and Japan are the top ten countries having the most internet freedom. On the internet freedom scale, countries with scores of 70 to 100 are classified as ‘free,’ while those with scores of 40 to 69 are classified as ‘partly-free.’ Countries with a score of less than 39 are labelled as “not free.”

The research claims that the ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is extending its grip on the state bureaucracy, the media, internet expression, religious groups, colleges, enterprises, and civil society organisations, as well as undermining its own already limited rule-of-law advances.

 

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